Thursday, July 30, 2009


I saw this photo and I just had to laugh. It was taken at the first full-length color 3D motion picture in 1952. Apparently no one told the men that ties and goofy glasses do not match. My first 3D movie was Toy Story in 1995. I was five years old at the time and probably sporting velcro sneakers with some sort of embellishment running down the side. How times have changed...

Not the best day

I am not a baseball fan but if I had to choose between the Yankees and the Mets, I'm for the Yanks all the way. I have no justification for this choice besides my dad and brother having overwhelming love for this team. So, after my first time at the new stadium and still in a state of Yankee-bliss, I decided to search me some Yankee photos.

There is a classic sports portrait of Mickey Mantle flinging his batting helmet in the air after a weak day at-bat. This photo made me realize the intense devotion that these players have for their sport. Mantle said, "To play 18 years in Yankee Stadium is the best thing that could ever happen to a ballplayer."

Tuesday, July 28, 2009

Dior's Zest

Christian Dior once said, "Zest is the secret of all beauty. There is no beauty that is attractive without zest."

And it was Dior's zest that made him the founder of one of the world's top fashion houses. I just wish I could afford it...

Monday, July 27, 2009

"Hello, I'm Johnny Cash".

I've never been a huge fan of Johnny Cash but it was the portrayal in Walk the Line, starring Joaquin Phoenix and Reese Witherspoon, that brought my attention to his life and career.

In an interview, Cash told LIFE, "The ideas come in little bits or big pieces. I write them down and sometimes carry them around for years, in my head."

Wednesday, July 22, 2009

Kissy, Kissy

One of the most famous photographs ever published by LIFE was Alfred Eisenstaedt's V-J day in Times Square. Eisenstaedt shot this celebrated photograph in Times Square on August 14, 1945, the day Japan surrendered, effectively ending World War II. The image was published a week later in LIFE magazine among many photographs of celebrations around the country that were presented in a twelve-page section called Victory.

You can also check out the photo on Google Hosted Images:

Tuesday, July 21, 2009

Brotherly Love

Since the anniversary of John F. Kennedy, Jr.'s death, I have been interested in photography of the Kennedy family. I came across this wonderdul photo of John F. Kennedy and his brother, Robert F. Kennedy, sitting head-to-head in a hotel suite. This photo was taken when JFK was still a presidential candidate while his brother, Bobby, was his campaign organizer. Little did JFK know that 49 years later, rumors would be flying this his brother was having an affair with his wife, Jackie.

You can also find it on Google Hosted Images:

Monday, July 20, 2009

Puppetz are for kidz

I was looking through some of my favorite Alfred Eisenstaedt photographs and I came across this classic, Children at Puppet Theatre. I always get a kick out of the childrens' reactions to the puppet show. It reminds me of the birthday parties I used to go to as a kid. Enjoy...

Friday, July 17, 2009

Remembering JFK Jr.

Yesterday marked the tenth anniversary of John F. Kennedy, Jr.’s death. On July 16, 1999, Kennedy was killed along with his wife Carolyn and sister-in-law Lauren Bessette when the aircraft he was piloting crashed into the Atlantic Ocean. Kennedy and his wife were travelling together to the wedding of his cousin Rory in Hyannis, Massachusetts, while Lauren was to have been dropped off at Martha's Vineyard en route.

Since birth, John F. Kennedy Jr. lived a life in the spotlight. He was born sixteen days after his father was elected to presidency and when he was only three years old, his father was assassinated by Lee Harvey Oswald in Dallas, Texas. At the funeral procession, JFK Jr. stepped forward and rendered a final salute as the flag-draped casket was carried out from St. Matthew's Cathedral. This captured moment ultimately became an iconic image of the 1960s and one that is celebrated to this day.

Thursday, July 16, 2009

"What'choo talkin' 'bout, Willis?"

233 South Wacker Drive is no longer being occupied by Sears Tower, a building that in 1973, at the time of its completion, was the tallest building in the world. As of today, the iconic Chicago, Illinois, skyscraper is now named Willis Tower after Willis Group Holdings, the new naming-rights owners. The recent name change, however, is not being taken lightly. On the social networking website,, 93,110 have joined the group "People Against the Sears Tower Name Change.” Although this is the largest group of its kind, seventy other groups were created to boycott the same cause. One member said, “I think landmarks should keep their names. Do you think the French would stand for a renaming of the Eiffel Tower? Doubt it! It'll remain the ‘Sears Tower’ forever to me.”

Although Sears’ naming rights had expired in 2003, the building has continued to be called Sears Tower until 10 am this morning when Willis Group Holdings’ 140,000 square feet lease of the building came into effect. It seems, however, that to Chicago natives it will still be known as the Sears Tower.

I await the day when I can ask a cab driver in Chicago to take me to Willis Tower and they ask me where the heck that is.